Hottest Trends for 2011
In real estate it’s all about Location, Location, Location. But in fashion it’s Accessories, Accessories, Accessories! And, there’s no better way to update your wardrobe, and pull all your looks together, than with jewelry. 

Jewelry, a wardrobe’s best defense from ho-hum, can add texture, color and all around pizzazz to the fashion classics at the core of your closet—like that little black dress, tailored white button-down blouse, and even jeans and a T-shirt.
 
Although jewelry trends embrace a spectrum of styles, influenced by the mega movement for individuality and personalization, there are important design directions that have staked their claim among fashion’s favorites.
 
Check out some of the new season’s key looks and get inspired!
 
Statement Makers
Coco Chanel’s advice to remove one accessory before leaving the house backs this less-is-more philosophy, placing a greater focus on one amazing jewelry look for the neck, wrist or hand. Popular statement makers include gem-encrusted bib style necklaces; sculptural and embellished wide cuff and bangle bracelets; sweeping earrings in shapes like teardrop and paisley; and large rings that are wearable works of art. It’s all about well-placed eye candy that marks the perfect exclamation point to your fashion statement! On the runway, Carlos Miele rocked this trend at his N.Y. spring show, accessorizing with iconic jewels by Ivanka Trump, including quartz crystal necklaces, bold gold and diamond pavé bracelets, and big quartz and agate gem drop earrings.
 
Stack’em High
Fashion’s draw on layering translates well in jewelry, especially when it comes to rings and bracelets. The trend is all about keeping it fresh and making it personal in how and what you stack. In rings, gem-set eternity bands and delicate settings with flower motifs or dangling charms are popular piled on. In bracelets, all bangles or mixed bracelet types and styles has become the red carpet norm, the more subversive the better in different widths, embellishment and materials. “Instead of wearing matching cuffs, we’re noticing celebrities mixing styles from embellished vintage to modern architectural,” says jewelry style expert and commentator Michael O’Connor. A great example: Heidi Klum at the 2010 Oscars in wrists full of coral and diamond platinum bracelets by Lorraine Schwartz.
 
Charms & Icons
The desire to express individuality is strong, fueling demand for jewelry that imparts messages like charms, family crests, initials, and special talisman. “Consumers are drawn to jewels that help make strong, personal statements. They’re looking for products that express who they are as individuals,” describes Helena Krodel, director of media Jewelers of America. “It’s less about trends and more about wearing what suits your style and persona.” Most wanted: designs of iconic symbols like hamsa hands, lucky charms, zodiacs, initials, and numbers. Great examples are found in the diverse and iconic collections of New York designer Alex Woo, who notes that her numbers and initials, launched several years ago, remain bestsellers. Heather Moore, a designer from Cleveland, Ohio, sees an increase in consumers searching for unique ways of expressing themselves. “Everyone has something special in his or her life to acknowledge or celebrate, which makes it interesting to see how people come to create different, personal pieces. Options are limitless. Celebrity fans of Moore include singer Beyonce, actress Demi Moore, chef Paula Deen, rocker Eddie Vedder, and basketball star Lebron James.
 
Mixed Up
Designers are more inventive in accessories that continue to be key in fashion style. The trend for bold design favors the use of metals beyond gold and platinum and other materials like resin, leather and wood. Focusing more on craftsmanship and design style that straddles classic and cutting edge, more designers are exploring unconventional options to mix with gems in fine jewelry like blackened steel, titanium, and gunmetal. New York designer Kara Ross typically rocks the runways with her accessories, recognized for her diverse use of materials. For their 2011 spring shows in New York, Angel Sanchez and Dennis Basso chose from Ross’ collections colorful croc cuffs accented with silver-plated brass, 18k-gold and silver gem-set earrings, and maple wood cuffs with silver and gems.
 
Textile Tendencies
Textile trends like ribbons, bows, layers of wispy transparency, lace, weave, and cutouts translate well in jewelry design. Many designers are creating large-scale pieces that are not weighty by using lots of open metalwork. There are certain patterns that stand the test of time, connecting cultures and bridging old with new, most notably the circle (an ancient and universal sign of unity), fleur-de-lis (signifying perfection, light and life) and paisley (representing a life force of growth and renewal) motifs. As nature remains a constant source of design inspiration, floral patterns also continue to flourish.
 
Black Beauty
Just as the Little Black Dress is the haute couture standard, black diamond jewelry has become the standard bearer of understated elegance in fine jewelry. Dramatic and edgy, classic and sexy, black diamond has recently reached a new echelon in popularity. It has even broken barriers in bridal—perhaps influenced by the film Sex and the City 2, which ended with Mr. Big giving Carrie Bradshaw a 5-carat black diamond ring because she’s “not like anyone else!” But diamonds are not the only gem proving that black is beautiful. Leading little black gems include black sapphire, tourmaline, spinel, zircon, jade, and agate. Carlos Miele rocked this trend with Ivanka Trump Deco jewels in black diamond tassel and mother-of-pearl necklace, white agate and black onyx drop earrings, and black onyx, white diamond and rock crystal rings. Black is big as a metal finish, too, like oxidized silver and black rhodium plated gold, offering a tough and unpretentious look.
 
In Neutral
Typically, neutrals have been the understudies in a show of color on the fashion stage. But today, they’ve morphed into lead performers, chameleon colors changing with every mood. For 2011, nudes prevail in ethereal shades of silver peony and cloud. Drawing inspiration from mineral, concrete and steel, these colors coordinate well with everything. Lately there is no expiration date for even the lightest of neutral shades," says Leatrice Eiseman for the Pantone Color Institute. Serving as the perfect canvas for richer colors, neutrals are also worn layered. Gems lighter in color that speak to this trend include quartz, beryl, and glimmering feldspar material like moonstone and labradorite.
 
Take Me Away
Lively color combinations of unexpected warm and cool tones create striking intensity in the 2011 spring palette.  Top Pantone colors on the New York runways—inspired by exotic locales like Africa, India, Peru and Turkey—include Blue Curacao, dusty tropical Caribbean “turquoise” blue; Regatta, a cool vibrant teal-like blue; Coral Rose, spicy, sophisticated orange; Honeysuckle, playful pinkish-red, think rosy-meets-magenta; Beeswax, warm honey-mustard yellow; Peapod, fresh spring-like yellow-green sea foam; and Lavender, pale purple with a hint of red undertone. These colors pair well with existing pieces in colors traditionally associated with fall, notes Eiseman, with new favorites for spring to punch up your wardrobe. Trendy gems: rose, green and lemon quartz, aquamarine, chalcedony, and an array of pearls. 
 
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